Thursday, September 9, 2010

Grandma’s Legacy: Slowing Down and Living Well

By Kate Kirby
Gordon College News Service
(This editorial appeared September 16, 2010, in The Salem News.)

With the faint smell of pine needles and the occasional crisp breeze, back to school specials mark the beginning of fall and subsequently the end of vacation season. I am on what looks to be my last weekend getaway: a trip to grandma’s.

There are no cookies waiting for me on the table, nothing wafting from the kitchen; widowed twice, my 78-year-old grandmother is a working woman. But unlike most other Ph.D. holders, she puts in 10-12 hour days as an underpaid clinical psychologist so that she can pack as much family time in as humanly possible while taking annual trips with her childhood friend. Blocks away from the Jordan hotel bombings in 2005, sporting crampons while traversing glaciers in Patagonia, and marching for peace in Sharm el-Sheikh with Suzanne Mubarak Egypt’s first lady, my grandmother aspires to die penniless working to live, not living to work.

Though she could probably use a little more daily R&R, her priorities are rare for the typical “American dream” lifestyle where family and vacation are often put on the backburner. Unlike most Europeans, the majority of Americans are allotted an inhumane amount of vacation time. As a culture we are overworked, whether circumstantially or by choice, and when those prime two weeks of vacation time do arise, we don’t know what to do with them.

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Cyclists Raise Money to Protect Open Spaces

By Kate Kirby
Gordon College News Service
August 4, 2010
(This story appeared in the Boston Globe, North print section, August 26.)

When the alarm sounds at 4:30 a.m., former Iron Man World Championship finisher Joe Walsmith gears up to train for a new kind of challenge. On Saturday, August 28th Walsmith will join other elite athletes and dedicated conservationists in the second annual Ride for Green, a rugged cycling event to protect the natural landscape of Massachusetts.

Walsmith, 38, hatched the idea for the Ride in 2007 while cycling 100+ miles along the South Shore and weaving west through cranberry country into farmland once inhabited by his great grandparents. Originally from Southern California, Walsmith said he wanted to protect Massachusetts from the kind of development he saw on the West Coast.

“I absolutely love it out here and I have a deep appreciation for all of the green space because I’ve seen the opposite happen in California,” said Walsmith, a current resident of Scituate, MA, who works at LEK Consulting, a life science biotech company in Boston. “Seeing what an excess in development does to the landscape is hard to come to terms with.”

Monday, July 19, 2010

Manchester’s Clarke Pond Targeted for Restoration

By Kate Kirby
Gordon College News Service
July 17, 2010
(This story appeared July 27, 2010, in The Gloucester Times online and print version.)

When locals noticed flooding by Clarke Pond, conservation ecologists devised a plan to preserve the compromised salt marsh. Located on the Coolidge Reservation in Manchester-by-the-Sea, the 12-acre coastal salt pond is projected to undergo renovation this September. The alterations, though minor, will help restore the ecosystem and enhance local recreation, say local authorities.

To reduce the flooding, The Trustees of Reservations, a Massachusetts based land conservation organization, in conjunction with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Restoration Center and the Mass. Department of Fish and Game, have developed a project that will improve hydrologic capacity. 

To increase the hydrologic capacity and reduce flooding, the group has plans to install a larger pedestrian bridge that will nearly double the width of the channel connecting the upper and lower sections of the pond. The replacement of the current granite culvert will improve tidal flow and improve crossing conditions for those who utilize the trails for recreational purposes.

“Our goal is to improve tidal connectivity which will facilitate the outflow of storm water,” said Franz Ingelfinger, restoration ecologist for the Division of Ecological Restoration at the Mass. Department of Fish & Game. “Increased tidal exchange will improve the turnover of water which will improve the water quality.”

Recognizing that the pond was restricted from tide flow, Ingelfinger, who worked for the Trustees of Reservations at the time, said he initiated the project to enhance the ecology of the pond, which is home to a diversity of flora and fauna. He said the ecosystem services that the watershed provides include: water filtration, nursery grounds that support commercial and recreational fishing, and important foraging and resting areas for breeding herons and egrets, as well as a number of migratory shorebirds.

“A number of similar projects have been conducted throughout the gulf of Maine,” said Eric Hutchins, Restoration Coordinator for the NOAA Restoration Center in Gloucester, and partner in the project. “Culvert replacement projects have been implemented in Essex, Newbury, Rockport, Gloucester, and many others are planned throughout the region.”

Friday, July 2, 2010

Salem Community Groups Plan Fundraisers to Save St. Mary’s Italian Church

By Kate Kirby
Gordon College News Service
July 2, 2010
(This story appeared in the Boston Globe, Salem Regional Edition on July 7, 2010.)

When The Salem Mission decided in 2009 to turn the historic St. Mary’s Italian Church into an apartment building, a crusade of angry neighbors and local artists banded together to halt the conversion.

Since then, many things have changed: The Salem Mission, now called Lifebridge, put the church up for sale until August 30 at $570,000, and that group of neighbors and artists formed a team of preservationists in hopes of rejuvenating the space, saving the art and opening the building to the public as a multipurpose center.

In an effort to raise both awareness and funds, the collaborative group now known as Salem Community Arts Center Organization (SCAC) will host an event they’re calling “Get-Together” on Thursday, July 8, at the Christopher Columbus Society Hall on 24 Endicott Street in Salem, MA. “Get-Together” will start at 5:30 p.m. and will include a dinner buffet for $20.00 per person, accompanied by a short film about St. Mary’s made by Joe Cultrera, a local filmmaker and lead spokesperson for the SCAC.

“The enthusiasm of this growing group is pretty encouraging,” said Cultrera. “There always was a strong contingent within the Italian neighborhood to preserve the church, but it’s heartening to see so many different people and groups catching a vision for what an arts center could bring to Salem and the North Shore.”

Friday, June 11, 2010

The Story of Modern Slavery Comes to Lowell Library

By Kate Kirby
Gordon College News Service
June 10, 2010

In 1980, Beatrice Fernando travelled 3,385 miles from Sri Lanka to Lebanon in search of employment as a housemaid. She left her three-year old son behind, hoping to earn enough money to send home. Instead of finding a job, though, she fell prey to a criminal enterprise where she was forced to work 20 hours a day without pay. Fernando was underfed, beaten, forbidden to speak, and cut off from any communication with the world outside the walled compound of the house she cleaned. Like nearly 27 million others around the globe, Fernando became a victim of the lucrative modern-day slave industry.

On June 24th, Fernando will share her story at the Pollard Memorial Library, 401 Merrimack Street in Lowell, MA. Starting at 7:00 p.m., “Slavery in the 21st Century” will be one of 14 free programs open to the public in conjunction with the Civil War and Slavery exhibit, “Forever Free.” 

Monday, May 17, 2010

Ready for the World!

On Thursday, May 13, The Boston Globe North published four stories of local college graduates in both its print and online editions. Each was written by a Fellow with the Gordon College News Service:

"A dream of greening Afghanistan drives Endicott student" by Alysa Obert.

"Working hard to ensure his kids will have it easier" by Amanda C. Thompson.

"A false step, then on to success with Mandarin Chinese" by Maggie Roth.

"Syrian woman defies tradition to educate herself, help others" by Muriel Hoffacker.

Congratulations to the Fellows and the graduates!

Monday, May 10, 2010

Opinion: Forced Encounters of the Fourth Estate

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
May 6, 2010

I am terrified of two things, even though both happen to be in my blood: journalism and airplanes. I have an insatiable itch for truth and a curiosity for new lands. And yet, I know that with each interview, as with each walk down the jet way, comes an invitation, an inevitable flirting with death, and an obligation to defy the comfort of my own germ-phobic skin to interact with the Other.

On a recent flight from Chicago (home) to Boston (college), for instance, a plump tan man with a Marine Corps bag caught my eye. Is the bag for pleasure or for politics? I thought, amusing myself with the cleverness of me. What I actually said was, “Is Boston home?” “No,” he said.  “Redwing, Minnesota. I commute twice a month.”

Gary was uncommonly gracious. I was cranky that the plane was late. I was mad that I wouldn’t finish my article on time and most of all I was annoyed that on this Boeing 737 with twenty passengers, he sat next to me.

Opinion: One Graduate’s Gift for Mother’s Day

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
May 5, 2010
(This editorial appeared May 8 in The Salem News.)

At age 15, nothing is more humiliating than having your mom poke your elbow with a fork at the dinner table reminding you to get it off, when the boy you’re dating is sitting right across from you. Hours later, he breaks up with you saying, “You’re a little too weird for me.”  Your mom insists that she knew all along he wasn’t “Mr. Right.”

How about the time she dropped you off at school during the bustle of the morning traffic, singing the American national anthem at the top of her lungs, insisting on starting your day with excitement as you climbed out of the car? You slammed the door relieved that her sound would be muted, only to hear the Canadian national anthem streaming out as she rolled down the windows. All your peers stared at you and you were convinced your heart was beating so fast you thought it would burst.  Years later Mom visits you at college, takes you out to lunch and then when she drops you off at the dorm, she does it: She belts out the national anthem. Again.

Opinion: An Open Plea to Kill the “After-Graduation” Question

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
May 3, 2010
(This editorial appeared Saturday, May 15, in The Salem News.)

Dear Friends, Family and all others generally concerned with the future of college seniors:

As we enter the month of May, many things start to happen. The leaves turn green again, the birds start chirping more often, the sun finally decides to break the gray “November through April New England haze,” and of course, seniors graduate.

 I, myself, as one of these upcoming graduates, feel the need to enlighten those who care with a small piece of information: Most of us don’t have a clue what we’re doing immediately after we pack up our dorm rooms and head for our cars.

It seems to me that the word “senior” and the phrase “what are you doing after you graduate!?” are synonymous these days. The thing is, I don’t know what I’m going to do. And when I get asked time and time again by people I know and people I don’t know, I start to get a little stressed out and the question becomes a hot-button. And when I get heated who knows what act of violence I might commit.

Opinion: On Being a Loser

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
May 4, 2010

Every time I go home from college for the summer, I find myself excavating the closet under the eaves in search of something I’ve lost. This also happens at Christmastime, Easter, Thanksgiving, and on sundry weekends throughout the year. I can’t help it; I’m a loser.

My favorite pants went missing for more than half a year. I haven’t seen my hiking boots since high school. There is a tragic space between Mae and Muse on my CD shelf where Matchbox Twenty should be. Sometimes when I leave my dorm I don’t even know where I parked my car. For the record, I hardly ever lose the keys.

But these things are only misplaced. More regrettable are the things that promise to stay lost: the poem I wrote in fourth grade, the recording of my best friend singing about green tea, the plush bear my birth father gave me when I was born (one of the only mementos I had of him).

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Get Rambled for Haiti with local folk rockers, Adam Ezra Group

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
April 21, 2010

When local folk rock band Adam Ezra Group sold out the Paradise Rock Club for their CD-release-turned-Haiti-benefit show in January, it was not the first or the last time the band would use their music for the good of others. On Sunday, May 2, AEG will play a concert to benefit Haiti through Partners in Health.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Road Bullies Challenge Bicycle Safety

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
April 19, 2010
(Photo by Muriel Hoffacker)

When Beverly resident, Bill Woolley rides his 12.5 mile roundtrip commute Monday through Friday from Beverly to Salem, he often times gets bullied, but it’s not because he’s vandalizing property or hurting people.  He’s merely riding his bike and making sure he stays alive.  Woolley thinks of himself as the “awkward, geeky kid in middle school” who is bullied, in this case by cars.

Medford natives brand the Boston lifestyle

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
April 20, 2010
(This story appeared in April 26 in the Boston Globe, Medford edition.)

MEDFORD, MA – The broad “a” sound and lack of “r” that makes up the infamous “Boston accent” can be heard in Charlestown, or Dorchester, or Everett, or even Medford and Somerville. To many Bostonians, the dialect is more than just an accent. And for this reason David “Buddy” Hanley, Jr., Johnny Cunningham, and Matt Taylor—all Medford natives— founded the apparel company, No R Lifestyle.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Beatlejuice Band Rocks Across the Universe for Melrose Knights of Columbus Benefit Show

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
April 11, 2010
(This story appeared April 13 in the Boston Globe, Melrose edition.)

Even when he’s getting a root canal and a Beatles song like “Good Day Sunshine” comes on the radio, John Muzzy is happy. In fact, that song in particular takes him to the Batman comic books he used to read while listening to the record. No wonder Muzzy, 54, of Woburn and drummer for the local band Beatlejuice, is thrilled about playing the Melrose Knights of Columbus food drive benefit concert for the fifth running year. The event is all music, all Beatles, all night.

After Years in the Race, Medford Man Sits Out Marathon

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
April 9, 2010

(This story appeared April 15 in the Boston Globe, Medford edition.)

MEDFORD, Mass.—After running eleven marathons, Edward Woods knows what it takes to be a successful runner. This is why, for the first time in five years, he will not be running the Boston Marathon.

It Takes Two to Tri: A Different Type of Community-Sponsored Triathlon

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
(This story appeared April 16 in The Salem News.)
April 12, 2010

As Boston will soon host its annual marathon runners and fans, so will a local town on the North Shore, but serving a different type of competitor.  The difference is in the race’s demand and the competitor’s motivation.

Monday, April 12, 2010

“Heavy Seven”: Melrose Family and Friends Bring a Film to Life

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
April 10, 2010
(This article appeared April 11 in the Boston Globe, Melrose edition.)

When long time Melrose resident Rob Azevedo, 31, sat down to write about seven critical moments in his life, he had no idea five years later he’d be seeing them on the big screen.

The debut of his 38-minute film, “Heave Seven” at the Brattle Theater in Cambridge yesterday, Sunday, April 11th, marks the end of an accomplishment that took guts, a lot of home-cooked elbow grease, and an all out family and community effort.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Somerville and Hamilton-Wenham Schools Ahead of the Fight for Healthy Foods

By Amanda Thompson
Gordon College News Service
March 31, 2010
(This article appeared April 6 in the Boston Globe, Somerville edition.)
Michelle Obama has just declared war on child obesity and Naked Chef Jamie Oliver did his best to start a healthy eating revolution in schools, but some schools in Massachusetts, particularly Somerville and Hamilton-Wenham, started fighting years ago.

“The obesity issue started in the ’70s,” said Mary Jo McLarney, a registered dietician who has been a food service director for Somerville schools for eight years. “But now it’s mushroomed. Everybody is making changes. The most important thing to remember is that change is slow; it doesn’t happen overnight.”

Locals Weigh in on Postal Service Budget Deficit

By Maggie Roth
Photo by Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
March 31, 2010

Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds. Monday through Friday, that is.

Because of an anticipated $238 billion in losses over the next 10 years (if Congress does not permit it to overhaul its outdated business model), the U.S. Postal Service (U.S.P.S.) recently announced it would adjust its mail service schedule, eliminating Saturday deliveries and its prepaid retiree health benefits. These changes, they said, would reduce $90 billion in costs over the next decade.

The Language of Work: North Shore Immigrants Translate English Classes into Success

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
March 31, 2010

When she was 17, Rosa Paulino-Diaz (pictured) moved from the Dominican Republic to Lynn, MA. She knew no English and wasn’t sure what to expect. Mercedes Paulino, Rosa’s 37 year-old single mother, had brought her seven children to the U.S. because she couldn’t find enough work in the Dominican Republic to support their family.  

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Tufts Students Chill with the Samchillian

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
March 16, 2010
(This story appeared March 18 in the Boston Globe Medford edition, and the Boston Globe Brookline edition.)

For Leon Gruenbaum, Brookline-reared inventor of an instrument called the Samchillian tip tip tip cheeepeeeee, it all started with an Amiga computer and a standard, black-and-white piano keyboard. Well, that and a Harvard degree in math, childhood piano and clarinet lessons, a little avant-garde jazz, and a move to New York.

“I wanted to merge my interests in math and music,” he said simply. On Monday, March 15, Gruenbaum brought the product of these forces, his “musical instrument digital interface” (MIDI) Samchillian, to Professor Paul Lehrman’s Electronic Musical Instrument Design class at Tufts in Medford, where students are learning to do just what Gruenbaum did.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Expert Sees Improvement for Economic Future at 2010 North Shore Business Expo

By Maggie Roth
(Photo by Muriel Hoffacker)
Gordon College News Service
February 24, 2010

Amidst orange juice and scrambled eggs, business professionals from across the North Shore gathered last week to hear an expert’s opinion on the future of the United States economy.

More than 2,500 business professionals converged Tuesday, February 23, at the 2010 North Shore Business Expo held at the Crowne Plaza Boston North Shore in Danvers, the largest business expo north of Boston. The event was organized by the North Shore Chamber of Commerce and hosted over 100 exhibits and hiring companies, ranging from small startups to national corporations. To start the day, John D. Katter, Chief Investment Officer of Eastern Investment Advisors, gave a talk forecasting how he thinks the economy will take shape in the coming years. 

Gloucester Celebrates Rudyard Kipling’s Captains Courageous: A Story of the Grand Banks

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
February 24, 2010
(This story appeared in The Gloucester Times and The Salem News, March 4, 2010.)

Not many adventure novels are the center of a town’s attention for a whole day. But on Saturday, March 6th, Gloucester will host its first annual Captains Courageous Festival, honoring both Rudyard Kipling’s 1897 novel, Captains Courageous: A Story of the Grand Banks and Gloucester’s cultural heritage.

From Malden to Wakefield: North Shore Senior Centers Join the ZUMBA Party

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
February 24, 2010
(This story appeared in the February 25 edition of the Boston Globe, Malden, and in the March 6 edition of the Salem News)

What does Malden Senior Center have in common with the fastest growing workout program in the world? Everything.

In fact, Malden Senior Center Director Christine DiPietro said Zumba is not only popular, it’s their most attended class, surpassing even belly dancing and chair yoga. But Malden Senior Center isn’t the only one on the North Shore. Everett Senior Center was the first to offer Zumba classes but Marblehead, Lynnfield, and Wakefield are also embracing the Zumba motto: ditch the workout and join the party,

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Arlington Native Takes Risk and Gap Year Before Medical School

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
February 16, 2010
(This story appeared February 18 in the Boston Globe, Arlington edition.)

After Jackie Eagan graduated from Arlington High in 2005, she knew she wanted to be a doctor. But before the 22-year-old lifelong resident of Arlington heads to medical school, she’s spending a gap year in the capital of Denmark.

“The first time I went to Copenhagen was in 2007 to study abroad during the fall semester of my junior year,” she said. “Then after I graduated I knew I only had a year to do something cool and living and working in Denmark was a productive option and an adventure.”


Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Melrose Church Spotlights Modern Day Slavery with Freedom Sunday

By Amanda C. Thompson and Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
February 17, 2010
(This story appeared February 18 in the Boston Globe, Melrose edition.)

When Sarah Sotelo, a member of Hope Alliance Church in Melrose, tells people about human trafficking here in Boston, the response is often the same: confusion.  

“It amazes me how many people still say ‘That's really happening?’ when I tell them about the problem,” said Sotelo, who says Boston is in the top 15 trafficking hubs throughout the U.S.

Salem’s History Showcases Women Abolitionists

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
February 17, 2010

Even as women’s suffrage was fresh in the picture, Sarah Parker Remond and Charlotte Forten, once residents of Salem, MA, and both African American women, pushed the limits for women’s rights in their time. The two were prominent leaders in the abolitionist movement, speaking to crowds of men and women throughout New England.

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Building Traditions: Family Fun Day Weathers the Snow at the Essex Shipbuilding Museum


By Amanda C. Thompson
Photos by Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
February 16, 2010
(This article appeared in The Gloucester Times on February 17.)

The art of shipbuilding has been a tradition in Essex since shortly after the pilgrims settled in. So it wasn’t exactly a surprise when over 30 Cape Ann residents braved the snow for the Essex Shipbuilding Museum and Wellspring House’s Family Fun Day on Tuesday, February 16.

Friday, February 12, 2010

Honoring Black History by Exploring the North Shore’s Underground Railroad

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
February 11, 2010
(This article appeared in The Salem News February 13.)

George Harrington, 20-year proprietor of Salem’s Lyceum Restaurant Bar and Grill, has long been convinced the North Shore has a rich heritage for African Americans, specifically as a haven for slaves in search of their freedom.

Harrington owned a house in Marblehead that was one of the oldest wooden structures in New England. “It had a lot of secret passage ways and it was right down near the water too,” Harringon said. “I’m sure it was an Underground Railroad stop.”

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Is Charles Darwin Ready for His Own Holiday?

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
February 10, 2010
(This article also appeared in BioLogos.)

Charles Darwin turns 201 this Friday, February 12, 2010, and schools and churches across the Bay State are gearing up to celebrate. Salem State College and the Unitarian Universalist Church of Falmouth, MA, devote entire weeks to evolution’s daddy.  If the International Darwin Day Foundation has its way, the 12th of February could even become an official holiday.

Not everyone, though, is ready to party. Some local scientists aren’t convinced there’s a need for such a holiday and don’t think it will happen. Karl Giberson (pictured here), a professor of physics and engineering at Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, MA, and author of the best-selling book “Saving Darwin,” doesn’t see the point.

“We don’t have an Einstein day or a Newton day. I don’t think we need a Darwin Day,” said Giberson. “Politicians wouldn’t propose something that would upset so many Christians.”

Patty Dupray, a science teacher at Beverly High School, agreed that an official Darwin Day won’t – and shouldn't – happen. “You’d get too much adversity from people who don’t accept evolution,” she said.

As Facebook Turns Six, Reporters Mixed on Its Role for Journalism

Editor’s note: In order to test Facebook’s influence on local journalism, the Gordon College News Service conducted all of the research and all but one interview for this article over the social media site.

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
February 10, 2010

Dan MacAlpine, veteran journalist and editor of the Ipswich Chronicle on Boston’s North Shore, initially hoped to wait out the Facebook craze. He figured it was going to be “just another AOL” and wasn’t convinced that it would last. So he decided not to put too much time into it.

Big Brothers Influence Massachusetts Women on U.S. Olympic Hockey Team

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
February 9, 2010

Meghan Duggan understands New England. She knows that no coffee is better than Dunkin’ Donuts and Cape Cod, Boston accents, Massachusetts drivers, and of course, hockey are wicked cool.

Duggan, a 22 year-old native of Danvers, MA, and member of the 2010 U.S. Women’s Olympic hockey team, is only a quarter of the women representing Massachusetts at this year’s Winter Games. Duggan plays alongside three other Massachusetts natives: Molly Schaus, 21, of Natick, MA; Erika Lawler, 23, of Fitchburg, MA; and Kacey Bellamy, 22, of Westfield, MA.

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

High School Student Promotes Film Festival Between Class and Practice

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
February 3, 2010
(This article appeared in the February 12 edition of The Salem News.)

Jessica Doherty, ’11, of Marblehead High competes on the swim team, tennis team, helps out with the recycling club, made the honor roll, and started her film career— all before her 17th birthday.

“It’s important for people my age to get out there and actually do something that they’re interested in,” said Doherty, who is also volunteering at this year’s Salem Film Festival taking place February 26th—March 4th .

Boston’s Own Olympian: Addicted to Speed

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
February 3, 2010

With a love for the Red Sox, karaoke, dancing and the ocean, Michelle Gorgone, 26, might appear an average Bostonian. What distinguishes her is a love for speed, which will come in handy when the 2010 Winter Olympics begin in Vancouver, British Columbia. Gorgone will be competing on Team USA in the Parallel Giant Slalom (PGS) on Cypress Mountain.


Making Music in Somerville: Dwight & Nicole Signing On with New Release

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
February 2, 2010
(This article appeared in the Boston Globe, regional edition.)

Local drivers may complain about the lack of street signs, but for Nicole Nelson, 31, and Dwight Ritcher, 34,—aka, Dwight & Nicole—Somerville has been full of signs. Now they’ve arrived at their long-awaited debut album, appropriately dubbed “!Signs,” whose release the blues duo will celebrate Friday, February 5th at the Somerville Theatre in Davis Square as a thank you concert for their fans there.

Will Eat for Cause: Local Nonprofits Head to the Kitchen with New Fundraising Efforts

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
February 2, 2010

They’re sharpening knives, grabbing aprons, and cooking up a storm, not for some culinary prize but for a good cause.

On Monday, February 8th, Beverly area chefs will show their stuff in the first annual Bootstraps Best Chef Competition. Sponsored by Beverly Bootstraps Community Services, a nonprofit organization in Beverly, MA, that seeks to give “a hand up, not a hand out,” the unique event began as an idea from an intern and has grown into a cook off involving four local, chef-owned restaurants competing against one another, taking the majority of their ingredients from the Bootstraps pantry and hoping their creations will win the flavor-favors of prominent local judges (including Mayor Bill Scanlon of Beverly, CEO Ken Hanover of Beverly Hospital, and cookbook author Anna Kasabian of Manchester).

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Young Voters Weigh in on Negativity in Recent Senate Election

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
January 26, 2010
(This article appeared in the Foster's Daily Democrat.)

For last Tuesday’s special election, Christina Johnson, 22, hauled herself out of bed and drove to the voting polls to cast her vote. But that doesn’t mean she was happy about it.

North Shore Christian Schools Weather the Economic Storm

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
January 26, 2010

If a handful of Massachusetts’s Christian schools have weathered the economic crisis, it’s not because the storm didn’t hit. “We’ve had to batten down the hatches,” said Tom Stoner, headmaster of Covenant Christian Academy in Peabody.

Nocturnal Jobs on the North Shore

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
January 26, 2010
(This article appeared in the February 9 edition of The Gloucester Times and in its online publication and in the February 15 edition of The Salem News.)
Lobster fishermen have it tough on even the sunniest days. But for those who head out to sea in the dark early morning hours—when the light is tricky and the sea unpredictable—the job can be grueling.

Survival of the Small Business: Cup Cake Cafe Celebrates Five Sweet Years

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
January 26, 2010

There are the vanilla butter creams, the chocolate swirls, and of course, Boston Cream. They sit in delicious rows beside Red Velvet, Italian Rum, and even Turtle-flavored cup cakes.

Yes, cup cakes. With 60 flavors and different sizes to choose from, the Cup Cake Café at 297 Rantoul Street in Beverly, MA, has seen a steady following of, well, indulgence since it opened five years ago.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Survival of the Small Business: Manchester by the Book

By Alysa Obert
Gordon College News Service
January 20, 2010

Eleven years ago owner Mark Stolle opened the doors of his shop Manchester by the Book. Although the name was not his favorite, the store has since become a staple in the community where residents view it as a place to rest, relax, enjoy a book—or two—and an interesting conversation.

Like most small businesses on the North Shore, Manchester by the Book in the center of Manchester by the Sea, MA, started small an idea and some books from Stolle’s parent’s basement.

Local Band Sharing the Spotlight with Haiti

By Amanda C. Thompson
Gordon College News Service
January 19, 2010
(This story appeared in the Boston Globe regional edition for Somerville.)

Until Tuesday, the upcoming CD release party for local band Adam Ezra Group (AEG) was scheduled to be just that: a release party. But when disaster struck in Haiti, the Boston-based musicians changed their plans.

“Our thoughts are down there with the folks in the midst of the crisis,” said Adam Ezra (guitar, vocals, lyrics, and of course, namesake). “We thought we should share our big night with them.”

Slowing Down Type: A Return to the Keys

By Muriel Hoffacker
Gordon College News Service
January 20, 2010

Next to the covered window of Katharine and Daniel Worth Larsen’s home in Gloucester, MA, sits an elegant typewriter, a curled, thin sheet of paper tucked above its keys.  Others like it are gently placed in the small, dimly lit living room.

The typewriters are not mere showpieces for Katharine, 34, and Daniel Worth Larsen, 31; they use them. Often, Katharine, manager of Walker Creek Furniture in Essex, MA, and Daniel, case manager at Salem Hospital, say the typewriters help them slow down and take the time to organize their thoughts as they type, aware of the mistakes their old machines will make.

Young, Smart and In Charge: North Shore Sees Surge in Young Leadership

By Maggie Roth
Gordon College News Service
January 20, 2010

(This story appeared in the Salem News.)


They’re young, they’re smart, and most of all, they’re successful.

Armed with motivation, energy, and fresh new ideas, an increasing number of young professionals on Boston’s North Shore are climbing the ladder of success and reaching the top before their thirtieth birthday.